Advocacy involves promoting the interests or cause of someone or a group of people. An advocate is a person who argues for, recommends, or supports a cause or policy. Advocacy is also about helping people express their concerns and opinions. 

There are three types of advocacy: 

  1. Self-Advocacy: Self-advocacy refers to an individual's ability to effectively communicate, convey, negotiate or assert his or her own interests, desires, needs, and rights. It means understanding your strengths and needs, identifying your personal goals, knowing your legal rights and responsibilities, and communicating these to others.

  2. Individual Advocacy: In individual advocacy a person or group of people concentrate their efforts on just one or two individuals. According to the group Advocacy for Inclusion "Advocacy is having someone to stand beside you if you think something is unfair or that someone is treating you badly and you would like to do something to change it."

  3. Systems Advocacy: is about changing policies, laws or rules that impact how someone lives their life. These efforts can be targeted at a local, state, or national agency. The focus can be changing laws, or simply written or unwritten policy. What is targeted depends on the type of problem and who has authority over the solution

Click here for an overview of some relevant legal frameworks for advocacy in DRR.

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